Notes from underground

يارب يسوع المسيح ابن اللّه الحيّ إرحمني أنا الخاطئ

Best fantasy books

I saw this list of best fantasy books from Reddit.

Top 100 Best Fantasy books:

This is a list of the best fantasy books. If you want to find good fantasy books to read, this list is a safe bet.

The list was created by parsing comments on the r/books subreddit, and takes into account both number of mentions and the comment scores.

The fantasy genre is the most popular genre in the data we have.

Since the list is created by parsing user comments, it represents the most popular fantasy books, or at least which fantasy books most reddit users have been reading.

The data used in this list is from 2018 and 2019. As we get more data the list may change and will hopefully become a list of the best fantasy books of all time.

I don’t frequent Reddit, and don’t agree with the list. I suspect that the list is a bit misleading. It might be more accurate to say that it is a list of the most-discussed books on Reddit, or perhaps the most popular among Reddit readers. I’ll certainly use the list to look for books I haven’t read — I’ve read 20 of the books on the list — and I would also order them differently.

Here’s my list of favourites among the ones I’ve read:

  1. That hideous strength Lewis, C.S.
  2. The place of the lion Williams, Charles.
  3. The weirdstone of Brisingamen Garner, Alan.
  4. The greater trumps Williams, Charles.
  5. The moon of Gomrath Garner, Alan.
  6. War in heaven Williams, Charles.
  7. Elidor Garner, Alan.
  8. The Annotated Alice: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass Carroll, Lewis.
  9. Lord of the Rings Tolkien, J.R.R.
  10. The lion, the witch and the wardrobe Lewis, C.S.
  11. Many dimensions Williams, Charles.
  12. Gulliver’s travels Swift, Jonathan.
  13. The hobbit Tolkien, J.R.R.
  14. The voyage of the Dawn Treader Lewis, C.S.
  15. Prince Caspian Lewis, C.S.
  16. Harry Potter and the chamber of secrets Rowling, J.K.
  17. Dracula Stoker, Bram.
  18. The trial Kafka, Franz.
  19. The silver chair Lewis, C.S.
  20. The wine of angels Rickman, Phil.
  21. The shadow of the wind Zaf¢n, Carlos Ruiz.
  22. Pet sematary King, Stephen.
  23. Harry Potter and the philosopher’s stone Rowling, J.K.
  24. Descent into Hell Williams, Charles.
  25. Animal Farm Orwell, George.
  26. Watership Down Adams, Richard.
  27. The Book of Lost Things Connolly, John.
  28. The last battle Lewis, C.S.
  29. Candlenight Rickman, Phil.
  30. Harry Potter and the prisoner of Azkaban Rowling, J.K.
  31. Harry Potter and the half-blood prince Rowling, J.K.
  32. All Hallows’ Eve Williams, Charles.
  33. The man who was Thursday: a nightmare Chesterton, G.K.
  34. The Eyre affair fforde, Jasper.
  35. The historian Kostova, Elizabeth.
  36. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Rowling, J.K.
  37. The chalice Rickman, Phil.
  38. The secrets of pain Rickman, Phil.
  39. Lost in a good book fforde, Jasper.
  40. Needful things King, Stephen.
  41. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Rowling, J.K.
  42. Midwinter of the Spirit Rickman, Phil.
  43. The owl service Garner, Alan.
  44. The princess and the goblin MacDonald, George.
  45. The subtle knife Pullman, Philip.
  46. All of a winter’s night Rickman, Phil.
  47. Crybbe Rickman, Phil.
  48. A Game of Thrones Martin, George R.R.
  49. The man in the moss Crybbe Rickman, Phil.
  50. The cure of souls Rickman, Phil.
  51. My life in the bush of ghosts Tutuola, Amos.
  52. The vision of Stephen Burford, Lola.
  53. Heartsease Dickinson, Peter.
  54. The well of lost plots Fforde, Jasper.
  55. Sophie’s world Gaarder, Jostein.
  56. A wrinkle in time l’Engle, Madeleine.
  57. Harry Potter and the goblet of fire Rowling, J.K.
  58. Shadows of ecstasy Williams, Charles.
  59. The talisman King, Stephen Straub, Peter.
  60. A wind in the door l’Engle, Madeleine.
  61. Duncton Wood Horwood, William.
  62. Black House King, Stephen Straub, Peter.
  63. The Phoenix and the Carpet Nesbit, E.
  64. Northern Lights Pullman, Philip.
  65. The devil rides out Wheatley, Dennis.
  66. Faerie tale Feist, Raymond E.
  67. Finn family Moomintroll Jansson, Tove.
  68. Desperation King, Stephen.
  69. The horse and his boy Lewis, C.S.
  70. Timecatcher Fitzpatrick, Marie-Louise.
  71. Neverwhere Gaiman, Neil.
  72. Mythago wood Holdstock, Robert.
  73. House on Falling Star Hill Molloy, Michael.
  74. The Long Price: Book One — Shadow and Betrayal Abraham, Daniel.
  75. The hunger games Collins, Suzanne.
  76. Lord Foul’s bane Donaldson, Stephen.
  77. The giant under the snow Gordon, John.
  78. The fetch Holdstock, Robert.
  79. Firestarter King, Stephen.
  80. The wood beyond the world Morris, William.
  81. Good Omens Pratchett, Terry and Gaiman, Neil.
  82. Mr X Straub, Peter.
  83. The shadow guests Aiken, Joan.
  84. The Earthsea Trilogy le Guin, Ursula.
  85. American gods Gaiman, Neil.
  86. Salem’s Lot King, Stephen.
  87. Her fearful symmetry Niffenegger, Audrey.
  88. Mockingjay Collins, Suzanne.
  89. First among sequels fforde, Jasper.
  90. Duncton quest Horwood, William.
  91. The wounded land Donaldson, Stephen.
  92. The astonishing stereoscope Langton, Jane.
  93. The Earthsea quartet le Guin, Ursula.
  94. The End of the World Murakami, Haruki.
  95. The family tree Tepper, Sheri S.
  96. The King of Elfland’s daughter Dunsany, Lord.
  97. The Wrath of Angels Connolly, John.
  98. The One Tree Donaldson, Stephen.
  99. The dark half King, Stephen.
  100. Macabre Laws, Stephen.

I’m sure most of those reading this will disagree with my ordering, but I’d be interested in recommendations of books not on either or both lists.

There’s also the problem of which books belong to which genre. C.S. Lewis’s Cosmic Trilogy, for example, straddles the border between science fiction and fantasy. There are some published as combined volumes that could be listed separately, for example Ursula le Guin’s Earthsea Trilogy. I also found it difficult to rate them. On the first reading I liked the second book, The Tombs of Atuan the best, but on the third reading it was the one I liked least of the three, and my rating of each had probably dropped about 10 points (out of 100). By then the trilogy had become a quartet, and the fourth book, Tehanu was the worst of the lot.

I’m prejudiced, of course. My favourite fantasy authors are the Inklings, Charles Williams, C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Roger Lancelyn Green, et al, who generally had the presuppositions of a Christian worldview, and I think they write better fantasy than most. But so did Alan Garner, whose work does not have such presuppositions, and some Christian fantasy authors, like Frank Peretti and Stephen Lawhead, wrote rather bad fantasy, at least in my view.

Single Post Navigation

6 thoughts on “Best fantasy books

  1. You have many on the list that I have read. I enjoyed those books because the they fundamentally teach morality, good versus evil and for those who do not know they are affirming (or teaching) the basis of the Christian faith.

    I couldn’t place the books that I have read in any order. They all show different aspects that lead to a better understanding…

  2. Reblogged this on A Pilgrim in Narnia and commented:
    This will clearly be controversial and individual, but South African blogger Steve Hayes has created his top 100 Fantasy Book list. The list clusters around certain authors, like Charles Williams, C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, John Connolly, J.K. Rowling, Stephen King (and Peter Straub), Neil Gaiman, Ursula K. Le Guin, Suzanne Collins, as well as some one-time classics and authors I didn’t know, like Jasper Fforde and Phil Rickman. I have written before about whether we could come up with a “Canon of Fantasy Literature,” and this “My Favourites” list is a great way to approach it. It might even be intriguing to do the list in such a way as each author can only have one book or series on the list. It would, as metaphorical foxholes often do, focus the mind.

  3. Andrew Schmidt on said:

    Looked at your list, and I clearly need to improve my pleasure reading list.
    For me would include ‘The slow regard of silent things’ by Patrick Rothfuss, and if he finishes his trilogy that might go on the list.
    The Gnole by Alan Aldridge is an good read and I have also found some enjoyment in the works of Brandon Sanderson.
    You might enjoy the ‘Night Angel Trilogy’, by Brent Weeks.
    I must have missed something in the Phillip Pullman books, because I was underwhelmed, but so many people speak highly of them.

  4. Troelsfo on said:

    I really like that you frame your list as “favourites among the ones [you]’ve read” – that is a good point to remember when compiling any list of this kind 🙂

    It is no surprise that your reading has a large over-representation of original English language books, with a smattering of translations thrown in – someone with a different set of language proficiencies would come up with a very different list, even if their tastes would match yours completely.

    As a Scandinavian, I particularly miss Astrid Lindgren’s fantasy works for children. They are, in my considered opinion far superior to The Hobbit, the Narnia books, or any of the Harry Potter books – but I am not sure how good the English translations are.

    Other Scandinavian fantasy could be mentioned, but this is just an example, and I am sure that other languages would have favourites that are either relatively unknown in English, or are poorly translated.

    • Adelaide Dupont on said:

      I’m not Scandinavian and I miss Astrid Lindgren.

      A Polish friend and I have recently been waxing lyrical over her works.

      Like the Bullerby Farm and Pippi Goes Abroad [which is the one which turned me to her].

      The English translations of the 1970s and 1980s are moderately good; the 1990s ones are freer.

      Some French examples which come up are Berna and Madame de S who wrote Sophie’s Misfortunes which is in a new Australian-sourced translation.

      As for Le Guin I love her genderbending in a planet called G or among a people.

      Michael Ende would belong on such a list especially with Momo and Neverending Story.

      And it’s good to see THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS as first on your list…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: